Frequently asked questions about cooling efficiency and K-CEP’s goals, structures, and processes

FAQs

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    What does “efficient” cooling mean?

    Energy efficiency can be achieved through equipment (such as motor, inverter, and compressor) performance but also through refrigerant efficiency. The efficiency gains from equipment efficiency are generally larger than from refrigerant efficiency. Efficient cooling can also be achieved through thermal comfort solutions, such as improved building and urban design, behavior change, and management of peak energy demand. Rather than seek isolated efficiency gains, K-CEP will take a systems approach to energy efficiency, and it will focus on solutions with the greatest potential to reduce emissions.

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    What is the scale of GHG reductions achievable through efficient cooling?

    A fast hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) phasedown under the Montreal Protocol can avoid approximately 80GT of CO2-equivalent by 2050 and can avoid 0.5° C warming by 2100. Improving the energy efficiency of appliances could avoid emissions of approximately 80GT of CO2-equivalent, nearly doubling the climate benefits of an HFC phasedown alone. Previous phaseouts of similar substances under the Montreal Protocol have catalyzed energy efficiency improvements to appliances in the range of 30–60 percent.

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    What is “access to cooling”?

    Access to cooling is an important development issue, with health, education, working condition, and other impacts. Global demand for cooling is expected to increase as living standards and populations increase and as temperatures and the frequency of heatwaves due to climate change rise. Several development goals can be achieved through access to cooling. For example, helping the hospital sector to achieve lower-cost, sustainable cooling can free up funding for patient care that would otherwise be spent on energy. Maintaining cool temperatures can also aid treatment and recovery. Medicines need refrigeration.

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    How does K-CEP link to the Kigali Agreement and the Montreal Protocol?

    K-CEP was launched to facilitate efforts under the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol. It builds on three decades of successful work on environmentally friendly cooling under the protocol. K-CEP will contribute to the new and welcome focus on energy efficiency under the Kigali Amendment by supporting implementation of the Montreal Protocol refrigerant phasedown. Pairing efficiency with hydrochlorofluorocarbon and hydrofluorocarbon reductions could provide climate and development co-benefits.

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    How does K-CEP link to the $27 million fast-start fund pledged by donor governments?

    The Kigali Cooling Efficiency Program (K-CEP), funded by philanthropic foundations, and the $27 million fast-start fund, pledged by donor governments, were announced jointly in September 2016 with the aim of helping developing countries phase down hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) while improving energy efficiency. The 16 donor countries are Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Together, the K-CEP program and the fast-start fund should kick-start the market transition away from HFCs. Details about the use of the fast-start fund have not yet been released. K-CEP will seek to complement the use of that fund for energy efficiency opportunities.

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    What is the relationship of K-CEP, the Efficiency Cooling Office, and the Technical Advisory Committee?

    K-CEP operational and program management is conducted by the Efficiency Cooling Office (ECO). ECO is responsible for conducting due diligence on grants, drafting RFPs, and monitoring and reporting back to funders. ECO is a program within the ClimateWorks Foundation, which provides oversight and management of ECO K-CEP grants. The Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) provides support to K-CEP on strategy, grantmaking, and progress. This support includes technical expertise from a range of stakeholders, including organizations external to K-CEP.

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    Which foundations and philanthropists support the program?

    The 18 foundations and philanthropists supporting the program are Laura and John Arnold, Barr Foundation, Josh and Anita Bekenstein; Bill Gates, Children’s Investment Fund Foundation, ClimateWorks Foundation, John and Ann Doerr, Heising-Simons Foundation, Hewlett Foundation, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Oak Foundation, Open Philanthropy Project, David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Pisces Foundation, Sandler Foundation, Sea Change Foundation, Tom Steyer and Kat Taylor, and Wyss Foundation.

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    What are K-CEP’s programmatic goals?

    K-CEP envisions a world in which environmentally friendly, energy-efficient cooling—facilitated and expedited by the Montreal Protocol, governments, and the private sector—is accessible to all. At a program level, the overall goal is to significantly increase and accelerate the climate and development benefits of the Montreal Protocol refrigerant transition by maximizing a simultaneous improvement in the energy efficiency of cooling. The K-CEP results framework includes shorter-term goals.

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    What is the timeline of the program?

    The emphasis of K-CEP is on action from 2017 to 2020. Because K-CEP recognizes that some results may take longer to come to fruition, it aims to create a legacy of post–2020 emissions reductions impacts.

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    How much funding is available?

    K-CEP’s total funding of $52 million will be used to fund four windows of action: strengthening for efficiency; policies, standards, and programs; finance; and access to cooling. It will also fund the Kigali Progress Tracker; monitoring, reporting, evaluation, and learning; and program management. Allocations among windows of action will vary, but the majority is expected to be dispersed during 2017 and to be used over the following three years. There will be a small reserve fund for unexpected needs or countries that move from Group 2 (slower-moving developing countries) to Group 1 (faster-moving developing countries) under the Kigali Amendment.

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    Which technologies are eligible for support?

    K-CEP will focus on specific cooling solutions. Priority will be given to those solutions with the greatest emissions reduction potential. Air-conditioning will be a major focus, but refrigeration and district cooling will also be considered. The program will seek to identify the most accessible, sustainable cooling solutions, which are expected to include building and urban design solutions and off-grid technologies such as DC fans and fridges.

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    Does the program support technologies limited to certain “global warming potentials?"

    K-CEP aims to reduce emissions and will favor work on technologies that are highly efficient and have low or no global warming potential.

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    Who is eligible to receive grant funding?

    All 127 countries listed as A5 Group 1 countries in the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol are eligible. K-CEP will prioritize support on the basis of emissions reduction potential, cooling market status (e.g., major producers, exporters), policy frameworks, political economy, geographical distribution, and existing initiatives.

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    What type of support does K-CEP provide?

    The program provides support across four windows of action:

    • Window 1: Strengthening for efficiency (S4E)—supporting the efforts of the Montreal Protocol parties, agencies, and institutions to integrate energy efficiency into the Montreal Protocol by, for example, providing support (capacity and training) for National Ozone Unit officers, enhancing knowledge resources, and funding immediate-action projects.
    • Window 2: Policies, standards, and programs (PSP)—advancing specific cooling policies, standards, and programs with significant potential to reduce emissions and contribute to development, for example, minimum energy performance standards, labeling programs, demand-response programs, and bulk procurement programs.
    • Window 3: Finance—leveraging significant additional finance, both investment and non-investment.
    • Window 4: Access to cooling (A2C)—elevating the profile of efficient, low-GWP (global warming potential) cooling as a development priority and providing support to the poorest countries and people to increase their access to efficient and low- (or no-) GWP cooling through a range of locally owned solutions.
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    How can countries apply for support?

    Countries can apply for support through the bi-lateral and implementing agencies of the Multilateral Fund of the Montreal Protocol.

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    Who else can apply for support?

    K-CEP will work primarily though the bi-lateral and implementing agencies of the Multilateral Fund of the Montreal Protocol. K-CEP will also solicit support from cooling experts and organizations.

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    How transparent will K-CEP be about its strategy and funding?

    Transparency is important to K-CEP. The website displays information on the four fund windows, funding criteria, fund access, and dispersed funds.